LOFOTEN WAR MUSEUM
SVOLVÆR - LOFOTEN

THE OCCUPATION
 
  















The morning of 9th April 1940
the people of the capital of Norway, Oslo,
woke up to a world not only new,
but somewhat unreal.
9. APRIL
THE LOFOTEN RAID
GESTAPO
OCCUPATION
THE NAVY
MIL.ORG.
RUSSIAN PRISONERS OF WAR
GRINI
BURNING OF FINNMARK
THE MURMANSK FRONT
LIBERTY
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SVOLVÆR
1940

NS
NASJONAL
SAMLING

RIEGEL

GERMAN
CEMENT
SACK


THE OCCUPATION
It was chaotic in every sense during the first week of the German occupation. In the early days of May, Norwegian forces surrendered themselves, quickly followed by the forces locating in and around Trondheim.

In the northern part of Norway, the fight against Wehrmacht continued with the aid of British, French and Polish armies, resulting in regaining control over Narvik May 28th. But not for long. Because of the "blitzkrieg" on the continent our allied forces had to withdraw and Norway capitulated to the Germans 10th June 1940.

Norway is occupied.


In Norway appointed as main political leader , was
Josef Terboven. He was a fanatic nazi. He was quoted:" If we can't make the Norwegians love us, then we'll make sure they will fear us". A threat he made sure to live up to.

He seated himself at Skaugum manor outside Oslo.
(Skaugum was the home of the Norwegian Crown Prince Olav).

He even made sure that no jokes were told in his presence. Terboven became "the evil spirit of Norway". And there were few to none who liked him..


As a part of creating a "normal state" in Norway, the "presidentship" demanded that King Haakon of Norway should abdicate from the throne, summer of 1940. Incredibly the very same "presidentship" suggested that the Kings abdication would bring "lasting peace" to Norway. This letter caused some disturbance, and in an angry speech held in BBS 8th June by the Norwegian King, he rejects this request. But the nazis continued the pressure, and 10th September the Norwegian parliament (stortinget) is gathered for the last time, deciding 75 against 55 voices the suspension of the Norwegian King and its old government.

The Norwegian resistance could hardly have had a more difficult start. Fortunately Haakon, the King of Norway and the exile-government stood rock steady in Norway's darkest hour, rejecting every attempt to throw them over. 25th September 1940 Reich commissar Terboven forbids all political parties, except for N.S. - Quislings political nazi-party. By doing this, the battlelines were laid. Exactly how many members the N.S. (Nasjonal Samling) had, is somewhat unclear. It is estimated to be about 50 000 members.


GREEN POLICE JACKET

GERMAN ARTILLERY SOLDIER
 
But some of these became members because of their jobs, others because of financial reasons. But those who really believed in the twisted ideas of the "national-socialism" and participated wearing their black "hird" uniforms, often behaved aggressively, showing no sense of humour. Even an innocent paperclip, the Norwegian symbol of togetherness, stuck to the lapel of the jacket, could lead to a lot of trouble. Many of the Norwegian "hird-men", enlisted in the Waffen SS, fighting on the eastern front.

The "new order", imposed upon the Norwegians by the N.S. and the Wehrmacht, was met by massive resistance. All over, sports clubs went almost to a standstill, with it's members boycotting sports events. Unions refused to participate, and the clergy men were firm in their denial of the "new times", which again led to their firing. New nazi priests replace them, resulting in empty churches. Widespread is the story of "nazi-bishop" Lothe who sits one Sunday morning in a restaurant downtown Trondheim, demanding a cognac. Not an uncommon sight. The waiter, in a cool and polite fashion saying: "But not before church hours, my dear bishop"….

Also the teachers gave the nazis problems. Most teachers would not bend for the nazification of the educational system. This was met by firm counteractions by the German
nazis. The protesting teachers were arrested and then sent to the "ice-front" at Kirkenes to
perform hard labour work.

During 1942, the N.S. and the Wehrmachts attempts this to get the Norwegian to "see the new light" totally collapsed. Simultaneously , the armed part of the Norwegian resistance increases it's activities through the organizations "Milorg" and the "Linge-Company". Officially called "The Domestic Forces". (Hjemmestyrkene) With their lives at stake, the "Domestic Forces" carried out several risky operations against Wehrmacht installations in Norway.

Parallel to the armed resistance, another battle was going on. The struggle to survive. Everything was rationed and, at times, even the items rationed, were impossible to get hold of. Regulation and restrictions marked every day life. People living in Lofoten and North Norway were somewhat better off, because of the access to rich fish resources. People living in the larger cities had only their ration to live on. The black market grew rather big, and the papers carried hundreds of ads telling what people had to swap. No wonder people looked forward to a change.

There was tension in the air around the spring of 1945. It became more and more clear that the collapse of the German armed forces was due and it occured on. The 8th of May the nazi government surrenders unconditionally. Hitler had shot himself, and at Skaugum, Terboven blew himself up. The motto from the "Domestic Forces" were: "Our struggle is crowned with Victory". And" Norway is once again free".

Not many know that as many as 10 000 Norwegian reported to duty in the Waffen SS. About 5 700 of these were sent to various fronts. about 700 were killed.

The picture to the right shows a German officer in the Luftwaffe.
To the left. An Norwegian front-fighter in the Waffen SS.

 



Not many know
that as many as
10 000
Norwegian reported
to duty in the
Waffen SS.

About 5 700 of these were sent to various fronts.
About 700 were killed.

The picture to the right shows a German officer in the Luftwaffe.
To the left. An Norwegian front-fighter in the Waffen SS.



 



German letterbox



NS -Policecap.




German guardian soldier
 
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